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Author Topic: Questions about the world  (Read 48035 times)
Deaddancecrow
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Posts: 38



« Reply #105 on: July 12, 2008, 06:17:12 PM »

Well I think that predators who cannot fit in this society because their diet isn't meant to eat vegetables and fruits have to stay outside..."wild" but not vacuous. Maybe some predators died out b'caus of this...
on the other hand...there could be birds that breed infertile eggs for the greater common and maybe they receive a better life like Kaiyodei said.
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You can call me DDC...
natoon
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Posts: 30


« Reply #106 on: July 13, 2008, 12:13:38 AM »

Kaiodei,
It seems that reproduction is slowed quite a bit amongst "civies", not sure if this is intentional or a side effect of being on the cusp of civility and not needing the "insurance" of a big family to survive. (Otherwise, Quintet would have had a couple litters of her own by now, forget about her mom's litter!)  I'm thinking a civilised bird would look upon bartering her eggs for food purposes very carefully,  even the infertile ones, as they might be rather infrequent.  As stringent as the veggie laws are, it's probably one of  those "iffy" grey areas that give the Rationale headaches.
 
Deaddancecrow,
You're probably right, but I think they wouldn't need die out unless they couldn't get far enough away from civilised (and well defended) populations.

Zachary,
Thank you!
So everybody does have a halo!
I wonder if schools of fish and swarms of insects can have a "collective intellegence," linking halos.
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Kaiyodei
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Posts: 125


trainwreck of thought


« Reply #107 on: July 16, 2008, 02:18:40 PM »

do animals that lack physical brains have halos?
*dies*
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i am on your fourm, isn't that fantastic?
Zachary Braun
(Administrator)

Posts: 118


« Reply #108 on: July 16, 2008, 08:54:01 PM »

Kai,

It's hard to say. I'm not sure of the answer to that yet. Specifically with computer AIs. I think the answer is "no".
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Strokend
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Posts: 249

Run away!


« Reply #109 on: July 17, 2008, 05:26:36 PM »

How can you lack a physical brain and still be living to HAVE a Halo?
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Yes, I am yugyna.
---------
In a silly conversation, my sister asked, "Why do guys have to learn to put the toilet seat down? Why can't we just learn to put it up?"
I replied, "Because sometimes we have to sit down, too."
Hellsion
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Posts: 32


Live and let Die


« Reply #110 on: July 18, 2008, 05:29:52 AM »

jellyfish?
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When logic and proportion
Have fallen sloppy dead
And the White Knight is talking backwards
And the Red Queen's "off with her head!"
Remember what the dormouse said;
"FEED YOUR HEAD
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FEED your head"
Zachary Braun
(Administrator)

Posts: 118


« Reply #111 on: July 18, 2008, 06:41:42 AM »

In terms of what is going on in 10%+, what with how the "identity" is being narrowed down to "decision" (and all the criteria needed to make decisions), one could theoretically take all of that data and upload it into a storage drive. If we then take a powerful CPU capable of deciphering that data, and then give it objectives, we have a "person". This non-organic person might not have a halo brain. I'm not sure if the halo brain is tied to an organic or biological existence yet.
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Rhiannon
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Posts: 1


« Reply #112 on: September 26, 2008, 07:52:23 AM »

About drinking milk. Human originally couldn't drink milk. They actually evolved a gene that allowed them to digest lactose even after they'd reached adulthood. People who are lactose intolerant are actually people who don't have this gene. Therefor animal could also logically develop this gene. However it is the question of whether they did or animal would allow other animals to drink milk from them. It's relatively easy for us because we've domesticated cows and they don't really have a say in the matter.

Another thing was I though of that carnivores may be able to get nutrients is through specially bred plants or fungi. Most likely when animals first developed halo brain they didn't suddenly begin to get along. They may have even had wars or at least skirmishes with other groups of animal, which carnivores could have eaten the dead from. Then as society progressed and they became more peaceable they began to breed plants with more of the nutrients they needed and as they did, adapted to eat them more than they did other animals. Until they reached the point where they didn't need to eat other animals, even though they still could. That would also solve the problem of their teeth being the same, because they would have used them for fighting.

Just some thoughts.
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EDIT:
Here's an example I thought of for the breeding of the mushrooms/plants and society developing from a violent to a more peaceful one (I kind of made it a story because that's what popped into my head). I'll use a pride of lions for it because they're already social animals:

Animals already have halo brains. The lions are currently at war with the wildebeests. The lions have always hunted the wildebeest, but now that they are smarter the wildebeest have started fighting back. The lions occasionally entitle the help of other local predators like hyenas, leopards, and cheetahs occasionally and they wildebeest are allied with other herbivores such as antelope, oryx, or even elephants. The predators eat the dead from the battles or just straight out hunt the herbivores.

Some generations later...
The lions have discovered a new kind of mushroom that gives them enough nutrients that they don't have to kill the wildebeest as ofter, provoking them less. They use the mushrooms as a good that they trade with other lions and predators.

Some generations later...
Some of the lions may have begun to feel there is something morally wrong with killing another creature that can think and feel and are feeling the losses from such a drawn out war, but as a majority they still hunt the wildebeest. They have begun farming the mushrooms and they are in high demand. They have also begun breeding special strains of mushrooms that contain more nutrients.

Some generations later...
They lions and other predators send embassies to the herbivores offering peace. It takes a long time to negotiate as they struggle through language barriers and old hatreds, but perhaps the war has finally stopped. The lions can now live totally on a diet of the mushroom, fish, bugs, and maybe other plants they've begun to grow. Some still hunt the wildebeest, but they're generally shunned.

Some generations later...
All the animals are at peace. They have developed a primitive version of common in the area (they haven't socialized with animals from other regions yet). A few groups still live as 'wilds' and some fall to their inner animal and eat the dead or buy illegal meat (like the whole meat/drugs concept).

This story may have been echoed throughout the entire animal world until society has reached what it is today.


Sorry I'm rather long-winded, but the idea just popped in my head and I couldn't help but make a story about it. I'm not saying this is what happened, it's just an idea.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2008, 08:35:18 AM by Rhiannon » Logged
natoon
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Posts: 30


« Reply #113 on: October 06, 2008, 04:41:13 PM »

I think mushrooms would have to make up only a small part of  their diet, at least in the raw form.  All mushrooms have some poison in them in the raw state. "Safe" mushrooms lose the poison when you cook, them, but even button mushrooms will make you sick if you eat a lot of raw ones.  Fish is a fine substitute if you can get them, but they are as sentient as the lions. Also, mushrooms have a pretty low concentration of nutrition in them, and carnivores like lions need high nutriton (like in meat) because they have short intestines which means not much time to digest things.
I really like your storyline, though!  If we knew how the animals got halo brains, maybe we could figure out a way in which the phenomena that created it could also effect some plant or fungus/mold/slime stuff in such a way to help make a meat substitute for carnivores?
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Strokend
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Posts: 249

Run away!


« Reply #114 on: October 08, 2008, 03:41:50 PM »

Actually, it sounds like a good thought. It is possible that there are mushrooms or plants high in nutrients - they can be crossbred through their pollen of the flower form (or spores in the case of mushrooms) to have just a small amount needed for the necessary nutrients. As Zachary said, there are 'pellets' or some such that help for their 'texturous' food needs, which the nutrients have been mixed into.
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Yes, I am yugyna.
---------
In a silly conversation, my sister asked, "Why do guys have to learn to put the toilet seat down? Why can't we just learn to put it up?"
I replied, "Because sometimes we have to sit down, too."
Kaiyodei
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Posts: 125


trainwreck of thought


« Reply #115 on: November 23, 2008, 04:30:54 PM »

so who makes the food? primates?
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i am on your fourm, isn't that fantastic?
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